Archive | January 20, 2017

January By the Numbers Seventeen: Stylish scalloped skirts swish shockingly (ficlet)

January by the numbers continues (still three days off, meeps~)!
From [personal profile] kelkyag‘s prompt “Stylish scalloped skirts swish shockingly;” a ficlet.

🕺
There’s the faux-history that the sight of an ankle was once considered shocking. There’s the myth about limbs and their ability to raise heart rates, and maybe those myths and faux-histories are true. Certainly, in many places in the Empire, the ladies go bundled up tightly, covered discreetly from head to toe, and then men are thrilled at the sight of a wrist. In other places, it is the men who wear long-vests over scalloped tunics over loose pants, and women peer surreptitiously to see the curve of a man’s buttock or the line of his hip.

In Urhallo, where the summers are warm and the winters are chill but not freezing, the women wear trousers made of muslin and calico and dress-like vests made of starched linen; the women smoke the fellna-weed that gives them visions, and play cards all night under the moon.

The men dance for them, young and single men, their vests and jackets coverings their shoulder blades and sternums, their arms to the wrist, and hardly more than that. The man sway their hips and thrust them, hum their songs and shout them, whisper endearments and sing them.

The men in Urhallo — all of them, not just the dancers — wear skirts, swishy ones that flow with their movement or straighter, businesslike ones that don’t get in the way and still conceal their lines from prying eyes. The dancers wear skirts, short ones, with scalloped hems cut just so. And the viewers — male and female — all lean forward, hoping the skirt will give them a little view of what the swishy skirts hide.
💃

Want More?

This entry was originally posted at http://aldersprig.dreamwidth.org/1238514.html. You can comment here or there. comment count unavailable

Please follow and like us:
error

Stylish scalloped skirts swish shockingly (ficlet)

January by the numbers continues (still three days off, meeps~)!
From [personal profile] kelkyag‘s prompt “Stylish scalloped skirts swish shockingly;” a ficlet.

🕺
There’s the faux-history that the sight of an ankle was once considered shocking. There’s the myth about limbs and their ability to raise heart rates, and maybe those myths and faux-histories are true. Certainly, in many places in the Empire, the ladies go bundled up tightly, covered discreetly from head to toe, and then men are thrilled at the sight of a wrist. In other places, it is the men who wear long-vests over scalloped tunics over loose pants, and women peer surreptitiously to see the curve of a man’s buttock or the line of his hip.

In Urhallo, where the summers are warm and the winters are chill but not freezing, the women wear trousers made of muslin and calico and dress-like vests made of starched linen; the women smoke the fellna-weed that gives them visions, and play cards all night under the moon.

The men dance for them, young and single men, their vests and jackets coverings their shoulder blades and sternums, their arms to the wrist, and hardly more than that. The man sway their hips and thrust them, hum their songs and shout them, whisper endearments and sing them.

The men in Urhallo — all of them, not just the dancers — wear skirts, swishy ones that flow with their movement or straighter, businesslike ones that don’t get in the way and still conceal their lines from prying eyes. The dancers wear skirts, short ones, with scalloped hems cut just so. And the viewers — male and female — all lean forward, hoping the skirt will give them a little view of what the swishy skirts hide.
💃

Want More?

This entry was originally posted at http://aldersprig.dreamwidth.org/1238514.html. You can comment here or there. comment count unavailable

Please follow and like us:
error

A Request!

My friends,

Today I am going to ask you to talk about me (and then, in fairness, I am going to offer to talk about you).

By this point, all 70-some people who subscribe to this blog know about Edally; you know about MARKED; you know about Addergoole and you know about my Patreon.

(You probably also know about Lady Taisiya’s Fourth Husband, Desmond’s Climb, the Beekeeper, and my sporadic crossover fanfic, about Dragons Next Door, Aunt Family, the Space Accountant and Things Unknown… I could go on all day).

But I would like more people to know about all of those things, and not just because I like meeting new people.

More traffic means more chance for ads, for one — Edally is still under the Project Wonderful traffic threshold. It means more Patreon patrons (which, for those of you supporting me on Patreon, means more content for everyone). More feedback — and we all know I love comments. (You knew I loved comments, right?)

So what can you do?

Tell your friends! (Tell your families, tell the people on the street… okay, I’m getting carried away). If you have a story you love, post a link to it. Liking Edally and/or MARKED? Tell people that!

Post a review! All four of my serials are available on Web Fiction Guide for review: here and MARKED should be up soon.

Post a banner! People like shiny things, maybe they’ll click on a link from a shiny banner?

Talk about the stories! Heck, I’ve gotten more than a few readers just talking about Addergoole on Twitter.

Write fanfic! Or make fan art!

Think hard about my stories in places where telepaths might pick up your brain waves. Don’t wear an EMF-protecting hat while you do so.

For any and all of this you do, I thank you.


Now, the reciprocal part: Me talking about you.

Do you have a project you want highlighted (yours, or someone else’s)? Let me know! Let me know where I can read it, what the best link is. Link me to a graphic, if one exists!

And I’ll plug, review, share, talk it up.

Cheers,

Lyn


(links to Patreon)


(links to DW)

Edited to add: these came out huge! Feel free to resize, or I will work on smaller ones later, too.

This entry was originally posted at http://aldersprig.dreamwidth.org/1237690.html. You can comment here or there. comment count unavailable

Please follow and like us:
error