Tag Archive | worldbuilding

Worldbuilding Wednesday: TIR Talk – Follow-up Questions


Kunama asked:

How did the children of Danu become royalty?

Ah, an interesting question from the left there.  Okay.  The children of Danu are royalty because they declared themselves such.

And that is a documented fact, so I’m not risking myself in any way with this question.

The children of Danu came here – to California, to North America – when hundreds and thousands of other people were immigrating here, and they found a place where they could lay claim.

Their powers weren’t as strong back then as they are now, but “in the land of the blind” and all that.  There’s no indication in historical records of any specifics, but considering what Queen Larissa is known to be able to do, one can extrapolate backwards to what her ancestors may have been able to do, and a woman with the ability to, for instance, read her opponents’ minds or convince them to do what she says, convince them to love her, convince them that she is the proper person for a position or simply blackmail them very effectively.

Again – there is no proof or even written suggestions that the early Queens and Duchesses of Tír na Cali used any of those powers on anyone.  None of the contemporary histories mention anything of the sort – the women of Danu’s children of that era were immensely charismatic, and that is documented and also unsurprising. Many women of the Danu today are also very charismatic.

But they created the nation and, in doing so, they created the hierarchy and the positions and titles which made them royal.  And thus they are royalty.

And that is the story that the history books tell, and that is the story that I’m going to tell up here.


This is a follow-up to two weeks ago’s “TIR Talk” post – feel free to ask more questions on any of the Worldbuilding Wednesday posts! 

 

Worldbuilding Wednesday – the Aunt Family

Last week I was taking questions on the Aunt Family and magic!  I got two.

Eseme asked: Much of their magic seems to be craft based, and involves imbuing magic in items. Does this only work on handmade objects?

I imagine if you were sitting at a mechanical knitting loom or fabric loom and putting all of your magic and will into it, you could probably imbue magic into its creation as well, but I think that’s not as easy — it takes more concentration & attention to the magic – than doing it the “old-fashioned” way. 

Imbuing an object that you haven’t made at all with magic – a trinket from the store – would require a lot more power, and thus would usually be part of some sort of ritual, generally involving several casters at once.

🍰 

@SamTTC on Twitter asked:  Is there any relationship between calorie cost to the caster relative to the energy output of a spell?

That’s a good question.  I’ve definitely done that in other settings – Fae Apoc, Tír na Cali for sure.

In Aunt Family, I’d say that there IS a relationship, but the ratio depends on the strength of the caster and the strength of the connections she has to pull on.

That is, the same spell and effect would take much more physical energy for a weak caster with no family (or family land) to draw on, than for one of the Aunts of a Family, especially if she was on family land – running a marathon vs. walking a mile, for a bit of an exaggeration. 

👩‍🌾

 

It’s #WorldBuildingWednesday!

It’s #WorldBuildingWednesday!

Today I am soliciting questions on my Rural Fantasy ‘Verse, the Aunt Family, and if you like specifics, specifically on the magic in that world.

 

The Aunt Family is one of the themes available for my Great NanoWrimo Prompt Call, which is still running!   See here on Ko-fi, and see many stories posted this month here on Patreon.

Worldbuilding Wednesday: TIR Talk (Fairy Odd Powers)

So @Shutsumon started doing Worldbuilding Wednesday on Mastodon and that got me thinking and so then I started and…

well, here’s last week’s post. I’m going to try to post them a week after I toot (post on Mastodon) them.

Is anyone interested in these? They do not seem to be getting comments. 🎣

 


The mark of a royal[1] in Cali is generally considered to be threefold, with a fourth not widely acknowledged but no less real. Continue reading

Worldbuilding Wednesday: Strands in Odd Places

So @Shutsumon started doing Worldbuilding Wednesday on Mastodon and that got me thinking and so then I started and…

well, here’s last week’s post. I’m going to try to post them a week after I toot (post on Mastodon) them.


Strands in Weird Places

In theory, Stranded World is composed of “Strands” which make up the connections of every thing and being to every other thing and being; certain people can see, manipulate, or read the Strands but they come into existence and eventually fade away on their own in a constant cycle of renewal. 

In practice, the Strands that strand-workers read/manipulate are like you took a page full of the very lightest pencil lines going everywhere and then added just a few bright marker lines: strong connections between people or between a person and an animal/plant/thing.  

For instance: I have a very strong connection with my husband, a rather strong connection with my cats, and rather strong connections with my grandparent’s house/farm. Compared to my connection to the guy sitting across from me on the bus, the cat I saw at the winery the other week, the apartment we lived in for a couple months when I was 20, those connections are going to be thick and easy to pick out. 

Sometimes, you end up with “Weird” connections:

People who met for three minutes at a bus stop who form a Strand so thick it pulls them back together, so that they reinforce that strand, so that it pulls them together again. 

A place that takes on so much of its own character that it holds on to connections; not only do people remember it for a long time, but it remembers them, and so the strands are no longer dependent on living memory. 

A moment in time will, on very rare occasion, create connections, which form a line between all of the people experiencing that moment and anchor people to that moment.  In some cases, it makes time warp strangely around it, such that even thinking about it for too long can create wrinkles much later on. 

Sometimes you end up with places, or animals, or plants that somehow not just form strands — since everyone and everything can do that to some degree — but manipulate them. 

There’s a tree in the middle of a forest that likes to loosen some bonds and form others, and you never know until you climb up into its branches which might happen. 

There’s a cat who wanders the suburban evenings tangling strands up, leaving a wake of small chaos behind her and caring about as much as she’d care about a ball of yarn. 

And there are events which are so tangled up from their very creation that just moving towards them — Burning Man, but only sometimes, for instance; certain marches on certain places; certain prayer circles and certain parties — changes the person moving, for better or for worse. 

The Great NanoWrimo Prompt Call

Today I am Feeling uncreative

The Great NanoWrimo Prompt Call

Today, I am feeling uncreative, and so I beg your aid in a story I am writing for the Great NanoWrimo Prompt Call.

I point your attention, if I may, to the world of Things Unspoken.

Cities/places already in existence include

Scheffenon, the Scheif Harbor, high on the Northern Sea (where there are Cornesc-speaking people)
(Scheffenon isnot a Cornesc word, but one from the people who had been here before)

Orschëst, down by the southern border

Corthwin (where the Ash remains unburnt)

the western cities, the ones that had once belonged to an Empire called only To (never the To Empire, the Tovan nation, or anything else, just To)

Here is a very draft map – http://www.lynthornealder.com/2015/04/28/what-happens-in-meetings-a-draft-map-of-part-of-the-unspoken-world/

So!  I need another city.  There’s sort of obviously not one language to this Empire, so it doesn’t have to sound like those above, but should sound… “exotic?”  Well, not Springfield or Washington, let’s go with that.

(Most of my named people have Eastern-European-inspired names, just as a note)

Halp?

(If I get more than one, i’ll clearly just have to write another story)

Lord Eigeran (a wiki page)

From Tapaciore, the online grimoire

For the late-Rioren Dynasty politician, see Gorpen, Governor Eigeran
Eigeran” and “Yarlen Eigeran” redirect here.  For other uses, see Eigeran (disambiguation) and Yarlen Eigeran (disambiguation)

Yarlen Eigeran Gwymden of Prówit Nod, Lord by the King’s Writ, BE 812-902, [see Deklegion methods of formal address]  was a Deklegion courtier most well known for his part in circumventing/averting the DeklegElherion Empire war in the years of 847-852. He is also renowned (although less so in his own nation) for his work in poetry. Eigeran invented three new poetic forms/styles, one in his native Deklegion dialect of Shoktu and two in Middle Elherith (having spent much of his later life living in the Elherion Empire).[1]

Among his best-known works and accomplishments are the Treaty of the Cliff, a diplomatic treatise in four languages (Shoktu, Deklegia, Middle Elherith, and Carruph) which is credited not only with ending the conflict at hand but solving several entrenched problems in both Dekleg and in the Elherion Empire.  Because the Treaty was considered a diplomatically manipulative document as well as a translation, he was called The Thief of the Cliff or The Lord of Lies both in life and for many decades after his death. The latter title gained him a resurgence of interest from younger generations in both Elherion and in Dekleg twice — in the 18th century and then again in the 24th century.  Continue reading

Fun Facts About the (Faerie) Apocalypse

Originally posted on Patreon in July 2018 and part of the Great Patreon Crossposting to WordPress.

  1. Fae Apoc was born because I wanted to write a serial like Tales of MU (long-running modern-esque fantasy university serial with a heavy dose of BDSM and many other kinks).  It came off of the Tír na Cali setting and, as such, there’s still some visible similarities, even beyond the collars.
  2. Other elements in the Fae Apoc ‘verse came from three short stories I was working on, one based on things I had wanted out of a roleplay reincarnation set-up and never gotten and the other two having heavy overtones of a group of people I used to live with. (Midnight Cigarette, Wings, and a piece whose title I don’t remember).  Oh!  And a piece I don’t think I ever finished about closing portals.
  3. The core words in the Ellehemaei lexicon came from a babble-language that I used to speak to myself, although they were nudged a bit for consistency.
  4. “Kept/Keeper” was originally supposed to be one casual term out of many; that’s part of the reason that in more recent serial stories I’ve been trying on different terms
  5. The Laws of the Ellehemaei were literally written to screw the protagonists.  Of course, in-setting, they were made to screw with (punish, control) the fae, so this works out pretty well.
  6. Fae Apoc is the only setting currently that will be willed to someone other than my husband on my death (Inspector Caracal).
  7. I have only sold one published story out of Fae Apoc – Monster Godmother (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NUOIEEC/ref=cm_sw_su_dp)

Want more?

World Building June Day 13 – A Diagram?

In the post I did yesterday, I mentioned a Jackal house, a “very small building on the outskirts of town that has only the bare necessities to survive,” in the Bear Empire, reserved for those who are taking advantage of the charity/kindness of others.

If you’ve been following on my Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/aldersprig/posts?tag=boom), you may have noticed that I’ve been drawing little maps and floor plans in Excel and Paint.

So when I was like “tiny building, bare necessities….”

Of course I had to draw it.

And I might have mentioned that I’ve been taking all-day Administrative Excellence classes on Wednesdays.

This leads to a lot of doodling and drawing.

So uh.  There’s a reason I draw these things in Excel usually, and below you’ll see both versions.

A “Jackal House” in the Bear Empire, as it might look.  Fire is a required necessity for survival.  Windows are not.

As the sketch shows, a stack of firewood outside the house on the windward side provides more firewood and also insulation.  The high-pitched roofline provides protection. 

 

 

World Building June Day 13 – Money and Mooches

It’so June WorldBuilding So I’m building Worlds!  Aerax/Expectant Woods over on Patreon, and Bear Empire and a new thing here!

(mostly Bear Empire now, though I’ll make sure I at least post everything I wrote on the Ezra IV Colonies)

13- What type of economic structures do they follow?

As a whole, the Bear Empire works on a mostly-capitalist structure; that is, people sell goods and services for currency to buy other goods and services.

The exceptions to this are as follows:

* There are still large portions of the Empire (mind you, not lovely portions or anything, but portions) where land is free.  As long as you have four adults or more willing to agree to live there for at least five years, the local governor will build you a house and a barn and give you up to 200 acres (although in many cases measuring those acres is complicated.  Ever measure horizontal land up the side of a mountain?).

* Taxes to the Shire, the [governor-area] and the Empire cover first and primarily infrastructure, but a portion is put aside every year for the following:

– relief for areas stricken by famine or disaster (inside the borders or, to a lesser degree, outside of them)

– Aid for the poor

– basic reading, writing, and religious education for all children from weaning to prepubescence.

This last one is new and still controversial, since it did require a raise in taxes across the board.  

* Within any town or shire, if someone has come upon hard times, there is a “10% rule.”  That is, rather than tithes to the church, people put aside 10% of their goods and harvests as they can, and will give, generally, 1/3 of that to any they encounter who have come on hard times

(on the other hand, if someone is known to abuse that charity, there is a thing called the Jackal House, a very small building on the outskirts of town that has only the bare necessities to survive. If you find yourself escorted the Jackal House, you can know that you have tried the patience of a town and stretched their 10% further than they are willing to accept.

The primary manner one gets out of the Jackal House, save from moving to another town, is by performing some act of service for every member of the town. )


 

Questions? Thoughts?  Tell me!