Archive | November 5, 2019

Brewfest, a late-posted Blog Post

This weekend  September 28th was Brewfest. 

I got a little behind in posting these.  Oops!

“Is Brewfest just Oktoberfest with a fedora?”

“It’s more like… Oktoberfest without a hat at all.”

That being said, around here, Brewfest, at least the one we go to, is at the Boathouse, which used to be Thee (yes like that) Amish Market and is now a nice combination of a brewpub on one end and a flea market/craft store on the other end.

With your ticket, they give you a little 6-oz mini “pint glass” and 12 tasting tickets.  Continue reading

Lord Eigeran (a wiki page)

From Tapaciore, the online grimoire

For the late-Rioren Dynasty politician, see Gorpen, Governor Eigeran
Eigeran” and “Yarlen Eigeran” redirect here.  For other uses, see Eigeran (disambiguation) and Yarlen Eigeran (disambiguation)

Yarlen Eigeran Gwymden of Prówit Nod, Lord by the King’s Writ, BE 812-902, [see Deklegion methods of formal address]  was a Deklegion courtier most well known for his part in circumventing/averting the DeklegElherion Empire war in the years of 847-852. He is also renowned (although less so in his own nation) for his work in poetry. Eigeran invented three new poetic forms/styles, one in his native Deklegion dialect of Shoktu and two in Middle Elherith (having spent much of his later life living in the Elherion Empire).[1]

Among his best-known works and accomplishments are the Treaty of the Cliff, a diplomatic treatise in four languages (Shoktu, Deklegia, Middle Elherith, and Carruph) which is credited not only with ending the conflict at hand but solving several entrenched problems in both Dekleg and in the Elherion Empire.  Because the Treaty was considered a diplomatically manipulative document as well as a translation, he was called The Thief of the Cliff or The Lord of Lies both in life and for many decades after his death. The latter title gained him a resurgence of interest from younger generations in both Elherion and in Dekleg twice — in the 18th century and then again in the 24th century.  Continue reading