Tag Archive | conlang

Conlang, Calenyen

I wanted to write the Calenyen classic blessing-on-parting, “smooth roads, clear skies.”

Turns out I had almost none of the words! Well, I had 2 out of 4 if you don’t consider the implied “May you always have” or “let there always be”.

What I had:

the word for under-clothes comes from the word lur, meaning smooth, easy: from kiprat-lur to kiplur and eventually down to kur.

eetan – sky

Subject-verb agreement
-unu beyond use (the sun, the moon, the stars)

ah- makes a verb be “always”

Plurals:
ootun beyond use , plural
-ak useful, singular
-anan useful, plural

Two: -te or -tye
herd: -be or -bye
Many, unknown: -ne or -nye

New words:
kaab – to be

tidzieg – a path, a road
tidziegnye – Many roads
gud – clear

Which brings us to

ahkaabanan todziegnye lur
(Smooth Roads, or “may your roads always be smooth.”

ahkaabootun eetan gud.
(Clear skies, or “may your skies always be clear.”)

ahkaabanan todziegnye lur
(Smooth Roads)

 

 

– Conlang for Patreon

We’re still in the month of Names, which Edally is good for.  But I’m going to do something a little different.

A couple years back, I turned several of my friends’ and readers’ names into their Calenyen versions, but Eseme was offline during that era.

She chose a colorful bird, so here we go.

A noun isn’t going start with an E in Calenyen; not unless it’s one of those that are Beyond the definition of Use — the sky, the sea, the mountains, the moon, the sun.

Now, a word coined first in Calenyen wouldn’t start with the se- sound, either. Continue reading

Baarbaarbaar – Conlang for Patreon

 

 

 

 

In Tuesday’s story, we have a character named Baarbaarbaar.

This is pronounced, in my head, like you started saying Barbara and got stuck.

(“Nanny Ogg knew how to start spelling ‘banana’, but didn’t know how you stopped. (Witches Abroad, Terry Pratchett)

Someone on Mastodon asked me about the etymology, so I needed to come up with one!

First I found:

baar: he/she (person pronoun)

But I do not think someone is going to name their kid They-they-they (or he-he-he).

So I kept thinking.  And I found (in my head):

we had the word baarbaan, horizon, which became baarbaanbaar, a name, which then became Baarbaarbarr *nods*

(Adding “person” or “them” to the end of a name isn’t common, but repeating syllables is.  So in this case, I think what happened is that you had BaarBaan, and to differentiate it from the word horizon, they repeated a syllable again.  BaarBaanBaar. And then you have someone mishear it and you end up with Baarbaarbaar).

In Edally era, names are not commonly given for their direct meaning, but in Baarbaarbaar’s time, that may have been different.  And indeed, as the Head of Edally Academy, it would be good to be one who looks forward, toward the horizon.

For more about Calenyena, see the Reiassan landing page here: http://www.lynthornealder.com/2016/03/09/landing-page-reiassan-2/#more-11655

Random Conlang: “Thanks” in Calenyen

Okay, so, because of reasons, I want to have an idiomatic “thank you” for Calenyen.

And, because thank you is such a loaded concept, I wanted it to mean, essentially, “good shot.”

Like, the thing you say when your buddy just caught the enemy/the giant cat that was about to kill you with a well-aimed spear. It’s a thanks for assistance, without acknowledging debt owed.

So we have “shot” in the sense of an aimed attack with a distance weapon: vettu

And then we have good, a modifier meaning skilled and accurate: -one (like the end of loan)

Vettutone, “good shot”: “Thanks for the assist.”

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Conlang all year round – SeNTAXember in September

Oh no, September is syntactical rules and I’ve already covered the easy bit, sentence order… wait, have I?

I covered Old Tongue’s in JuLECTURary, but not Calenyen’s.

Calenyen is Subject-Object-Verb, with most modifiers being tacked on to the end of words. Tense is added to the beginning of verbs (Goat-red food-low pasttense-Is-Loudly bleating-at).

Old Tongue Also normally adds modifiers after the subject of the modifier, a holdover from their system of diacritical marks in the original ideography.

I think Old Tongue does some funky things with tense, but I’m not sure what yet, or how. And I just learned about Anaphora and think Old Tongue uses this heavily.

Short post! But it doesn’t take many words to say S-O-V, V-S-O. 🙂


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury 1
Augovernust 1
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
Polysemarch/Juneme2
Juneme 2/2.5
AugGOVERNust 2
JuLECTURy 2
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Conlang all year round – JuLECTURy in September

I’m going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember one month a day (or so) until I get bored.

Here is the Julectury (“Write a lecture, lesson or 140 letter pedagogical tweet each day explaining how your language works”) which I wrote last week.


Calenyen is an agglutinating language with a habit of dropping syllables and an immensely casual attitude towards parts of speech (nouning verbs and so on).

It is also a language — like the culture itself — full of borrowing and thus loan-words, which, like most of the things the Calenyena borrows, it puts its own spin and flavor on.

So, for example, learnis see-do, dok, get, doket.

Child is Leroo; plural Leroone.

That makes school Learn-kids, doket-Leroone (and sometimes doket-oone
Or:
heleva is a Bitrani word from the Tabersi goddess Heleviaria, Deity of lines and boundaries. It means a meet and proper boundary, usually a property line, but also the lines between countries.
Teleba is the Calenyen word with the similar concept, agreed-upon border; but tol-tyeleba, toleba, is a border dispute over a bad border, something not allowable in the original Bitrani word.


Sentence Structure.
Old Tongue plays fast and use with sentence structure poetically, although in scholarly documents it tends to stick to one structure for the body of the text.

Most common is [Verb] [Subject] [Object], with modifiers coming directly after the modified object.

It is written from left to right.


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury
Augovernust 1
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
Polysemarch/Juneme2
Juneme 2/2.5
AugGOVERNust 2
✒️
SeNTAXember

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Conlang all year round – Juneme in August

I’m going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October…) one month a day (or so) up to September.(?) I’m skipping DismayCourse, shhh.

So I’m in Juneme again… Document or add to your phonetic inventory a phoneme a day, or add a rule to your phonotactics a day, or a Sandhi rule a day

Calenyen Phonatactics:

There will never be two vowel sounds in a row.

When borrowing words from other languages, the Calenyena almost always put another consonant between two vowels: Reiassan becomes reisassan. (ray-uh-san, rey-suh-san). Generally, when doing so, they will repeat a previous or following consonant; Calenyen loves repetition.


Old Tongue Phoneme:

Eron, (e) as in shed

This sound is a minor glyph, one that is often written down on the text line. Its original meaning is remaining, left-behind, and it is often used to indicate those fae that did not leave for Ellehem in the great departure.


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury
Augovernust 1
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
Polysemarch/Juneme2
✒️
Augovernust 2

This entry was originally posted at http://aldersprig.dreamwidth.org/1169538.html. You can comment here or there. comment count unavailable

Conlang all year round – Polysemarch/Juneme in August

I’m going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October…) one month a day (or so) up to August. We’re back around to Polysemarch…

…Today I get to go in circles!

The entry for the Thorne-Alder has this section on the Arran/West Coast name for the taxonomic definition:

The Alder belongs to the family of spear-leaf trees, adavijamin, where adavi is “spear-blade” and “jamin” is “leaf”. In that family, they belong to the mainer sub-family, “mainer” meaning “grove” or “family group, tribe.”

In typical calenyen fashion, the word mainer has been borrowed and mutilated into Calenyen – raimain.

(it is a common practice, when the letters in a loan word do not quite work for Calenyen, to move letters about or repeat letters. In this case, it likely started as “ramainer” and was shortened).

So… raimain is “grove”.

And it has also come to mean those that stick together clannishly. A raimain is a clique, a tight-knit group that acts similarly.


Okay, I give up on trying to do another one of these for Old Tongue quite yet, and I want to hold off on doing something with DisMayCourse, so ON TO JUNE(me) it is.

(Sh), shenera, which can be down with the modifier -eleg (a curved shape like a sideways lower-case “c”, down on the bottom of the writing to become savera, (s).

The glyph for shenera can also mean child, as the word does, and with the modifier, savera means bastard child.

Linguists theorize that the word savera came from the word savo, birth.


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
Juneme
Julectury
Augovernust
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
✒️

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Conlang all year round – Febumantau in August again

I’m going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October…) one month a day up to August.

And now we’re on to Febumantau for a second round…

and that means I can do another day! Yay!

If bikbaano is Song-Day, then the second day of the week comes from a deity we haven’t visited yet.

Which means we get to see a new deity.

This one is an old deity, one of the early Ideztozhyuha gods, Oonetoonen, from the roots Oonet, The Mountain, and noonen, climb (or oonen, a sacred climb): Oonetoonen is the deity of climbing mountains, of escape, of necessary things that are hard and painful.

And Oonetoonen’s day is the second day of the week, biknoonen


For Old Tongue I’m going to start with a compound word in English, bondroll –
okay, this one requires a bit of background.

If one is Kept (a magical type of submission), the praise from one’s Keeper (they who Keep you), is heady, pleasurable.

If your Keeper wants, they can get their Kept essentially drunk on praise – roll them with the Keeper-Kept bond…. thus bond-roll.

And in another calque…

Bond is tish, a lock, a seal.
Roll ends up being Otefote means wooziness; -ef verbs the noun.

Bond-Roll, translated directly ends up tishotef

(and never mind that there was already a word for that concept in Old Tongue…)


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury
Augovernust
Morphambruary 2
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Polysemarch 2/ Juneme 2

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Conlang all year round – Morphambuary in August Again

We’re back to Morphambuary for another two bound morphemes!

I’ve just started playing with bullet journaling, so today’s going to be a Day Name for Calenyen.

From an earlier post, I have:

From the god/dess Alivetta/Alibetto comes alittao, the art of instrumental music in Bitrani; in Calenyena, this becomes Litvaano, music (as played), and Libbaano, music as sung.

This has led to things related to music and song ending up with the suffix -v/baano.

Foremost among them is the name of the first day of the week:
bikbaano, Song-Day.

bik- by the way, is a shortening of bikdie, day; bik is used in all situations where the day is modified (holiday, song-day, birthday)


For Old Tongue, I’m going to pick another of those add-ons that are often marked by a single diacritical mark. This one, noen, means “now”, but only as attached to a verb: Stand Now, come now, destroy now.

Classically, it is marked by three lines |/ to the top right of the ideogram it is modifying. In texts using letters instead of ideograms, noen is sometimes written out and sometimes marked at the end of the word, as if the word was an ideogram.


Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
Juneme
Julectury
Augovernust
✒️
Febmanteau 2

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